Top Five Santa Monica Spots to Capture Timeless Family Portraits

Top Five Santa Monica Spots to Capture Timeless Family Portraits

I love Santa Monica and the care-free, easy-breezy vibe that it omits. That comfort and calm sets the tone for pictures that convey that same kind of comfort (and love) shared amongst your family. Here’s a list of some of the Top 5 Spots that make for the perfect “back drop” for your timeless family portraits: Palisades Park This lush, 25-acre park overlooking the Pacific is a wonderful place for walkers, bikers and people watchers, and connects with the broad Santa Monica beach made famous in TV’s “Baywatch” episodes. Great setting for your young and active family! http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g33052-d104249-Reviews-Palisades_Park-Santa_Monica_California.html Tongva Park Four distinct areas (Garden Hill, Discovery Hill, Observation Hill and Gathering Hill) featuring intimate display gardens, whimsical play elements with slides, a music wall and forts, spectacular views of the Ocean and Pier as well as space for relaxation, picnics and public art. This civic-minded park is the perfect spot for one-of-a-kind family snapshots. http://www.santamonica.com/visitors/what-to-do/attractions/parks/ Santa Monica Pier What’s more iconic than the Ferris wheel and roller-coaster sitting atop Santa Monica Pier? But that’s just the beginning; this amusement park is packed with rides, games, food and all kinds of family fun. The active and fun family could take over this park and create original photo keepsakes. http://santamonicapier.org/fun/ Santa Monica Beach Santa Monica State Beach is an iconic destination that draws visitors from around the globe. It is 3 miles long, covering 245 acres of sand along Santa Monica Bay. Broad stretches of sandy beach, rolling waves, meandering bike and walking paths, and inspiring views of the Santa Monica Mountains year-round. Of course the sunrise and sunset photos are...
Canoga Park High School Senior Photos

Canoga Park High School Senior Photos

We are taking Senior Portraits for Canoga Park High by appointment only on the following dates: Thur 7/10(today),  7/11, 7/14, 7/16, 7/18, 7/21-25 with more dates TBA. The Canoga Park studio address is: 21831 Sherman Way  Canoga Park, CA 91303 Note: We are currently booking appointments for 7/21-7/25 only. A few other important bits of information regarding the photo sessions: There will be a 40 dollar sitting fee due the day of your students session. Students and their families will be able to view their photos and pick their yearbook photo right after their session. As a thank you gift to the Canoga Park High School family for allowing us to be apart of this special year, we will be including a 5×7 Fine Art Watercolor print free of charge (a $65 value) on orders $100 or more, purchased on the day of the session. If you have any questions please refer to your confirmation email that you will receive a few days before your appointment or you can call us at 310-392-4900...

Teaching The Camera To See My Skin

Teaching The Camera To See My Skin Syreeta McFadden has learned to capture various hues of brown skin. When I picked up the camera, lighting brown skin in the grayscale felt freeing. How is it possible that the suggestion of brown, beige, cappuccino, cocoa, and sable skin was evocative in black and white? Somewhere in the grayscale, we didn’t look so off against white skin. The light was kinder. Or at least it was in grayscale that I learned the power of light and the limitations of the gear. I had control. I could capture blackness without producing a distortion of it. Most photographers in the 90’s didn’t have that control. Unless you were doing your own processing, you took your roll of film to a lab where the technician worked off a reference card with a perfectly balanced portrait of a pale-skinned woman. They’re called Shirley cards, named after the first woman to pose for them. She is wearing a white dress with long black gloves. A pearl bracelet adorns one of her wrists. She has auburn hair that drapes her exposed shoulders. Her eyes are blue. The background is grayish, and she is surrounded by three pillows, each in one of the primary colors we’re taught in school. She wears a white dress because it reads high contrast against the gray background with her black gloves. “Color girl” is the technicians’ term for her. The image is used as a metric for skin-color balance, which technicians use to render an image as close as possible to what the human eye recognizes as normal. But there’s the rub: With...

Let Nathanson’s turn your phone pics in to works of art.

Let Nathanson’s turn your phone pics in to works of art. With cameras on smartphones becoming more advanced, the best choice to take pictures is the device right in everyone’s pocket. Having a small, portable camera available at all times of the day is starting to become the norm over buying a large, expensive camera. There was a time when cameras on phones were a novelty. Low quality cameras took photos that were dark, blurry, and pixelated. Now, cameras that come installed on phones are capable of taking high quality photos which are good enough to want to share with family and friends. The technology has improved over time and it has created a desire to carry a camera to capture events as quick as they happen. Nokia brand phones are offering the latest smartphone camera technology as it uses pixel oversampling. The camera will take a picture with up to 38 megapixels and then use that large data to create a sharp 5 megapixel image. The drop from 38 megapixels to 5 megapixels may seem steep, yet the technology is working with what the camera lens is able to capture. When large amounts of pixels are compressed together, the resulting photo can obtain a sharper image and brighter colors. However, just because you have a great camera, doesn’t mean you can capture the best memory. Having a photographer with experience and proper lighting, and training is what takes the tool and makes the results you want. The 21st century advancements in digitalization have provided the necessary link, to provide our patrons with Family digital fine art. Many of...

10 Tips For Getting Kids Interested In Photography

10 Tips For Getting Kids Interested In Photography Sometimes it seems like kids today are born snapping photos. But if you want to help them explore photography beyond just selfies and Instagrams, it takes more than lending them your iPhone. So here are some great ways to share your passion with the young ones in your life, and maybe learn something about your own photography along the way. 1 Take your time Don’t feel like you need to jam everything about photography into your first session with a kid. The educators we spoke with emphasized communicating bite-sized ideas that children can play with before introducing more complex concepts. 2 Start with the familiar All of the educators we spoke with suggested starting with subjects with which children are intimately familiar—such as their families and their immediate environment. 3. Expose them to exposure After you have a few sessions under your belt, gradually introduce the concepts of shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Be sure to cover each one independently. Come up with ways to clearly demonstrate the way each one works and how it might be used, playing around with motion blur, over- and underexposing frames, and more. 4 Write it out Challenging children to write or tell stories about the photos they take is a key way to broaden their understanding of the work they’ve made. 5 Put down the camera. It’s easy for the device itself to be distracting, especially for younger kids. Seeing results moments after you shoot something can create an overly speedy mindset. 6 Give them a project. 7 Make an edit. In this world...
In a digital world, New York show wonders ‘What Is a Photograph’

In a digital world, New York show wonders ‘What Is a Photograph’

With no need for paper, prints or other traditional elements of photography anymore, a retrospective on the photographic arts raises several questions. What is a photograph? From photography’s very beginning, there has always been more than one answer to that question. On the medium’s official launch in 1839, a photograph was both a precise, one-of-a-kind image permanently fixed on a mirror-like metal plate (the Daguerreotype) and a replicable print on paper, made from a paper negative (the calotype, or photogenic drawing). Ever since, what photographs look and feel like has continued to evolve with changing technology and aesthetic intent. A camera or even a lens has never been requisite to the process (think of photograms, made by placing objects directly onto prepared paper), but a few ingredients have been constant: light, at least, and a photo-sensitive surface. Now, with the advent of digital media, even those basics have dropped away as no longer necessary. What is a photograph? The answer becomes even more elusive, rendering the question either moot or newly pressing, depending on who’s asking. For full article visit...